Flaxseed and Rye Bread with Avocado, Tomato, Basil and Mayonnaise Sandwich

I realize that this sounds like a mouthful but trust me it’s worth the effort.

Instead of going gluten free I’ve decided to stay away from all wheat; Dwarf Wheat in particular, and opt for other grain varieties.

I happen to love rye bread and the added benefit of flaxseed made this a great choice.

Although Rye does contain gluten, it is much less than what is found in dwarf wheat which is consumed today.

Let’s get back to this sandwich!

The avocado, fresh basil and tomato are sprinkled with sea salt and a large dollop of mayonnaise.

This is a huge treat for me.

The mayo is the only real dietary indulgence….everything else is so healthy!

It is a filling, delicious lunch that leaves plenty of room for watermelon later in the day!

Enjoy and share!

Tomato, Basil and Mayonnaise on Olive Oil Grilled Whole Wheat!

I remember growing up in my European immigrant family with great food.

Some from Italy and some from Eastern Europe but all of it driven by the freshest ingredients and much of it, meatless.

My grandmas and aunts always had their own gardens and were “putting up” or canning something at any given time.

For me summertime always means tomato and mayonnaise sandwiches.

These were not gourmet growing up.

They were just any bread with mayo, fresh tomato and “crunchy” salt on top.

I spruced these up a little by grilling artisan whole grain bread with olive oil to give crunch and texture to the bread and I’ve also added big fleshy leaves of basil for that peppery edge that basil can give.

Hellmann’s Real Mayonnaise is my favorite with this sandwich.

Even a few slices of avocado would be delish!

Get creative and keep it meatless. The possibilities are endless for a tasty, light and nutritious meal that says, “Summertime” in every bight!

Grilled Ciabatta with Veggies, Avocado and Fresh Mozzarella Quite Possibly the Best Sandwich Ever!

sandwich

It all starts with the bread.

With bread this amazing you really can’t make a bad sandwich.

032grilled cibatta bread

Ciabatta sliced in half and drizzeled with olive oil is placed under the broiler until golden.

009frozen veggies

I opened up a bag of frozen veggies and sauteed until soft.

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The secret sauce makes this fantastic!

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We discovered this at our favorite restaurant in town and the waitress was gracious enough to share the recipe with us!

017spicy mayo

And now we eat it on everything!

024avocado

Avocado makes this creamy and delicious

028ciabatta bread

The ciabatta bread is mana from heaven!

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Toast it just right with lots of good olive oil.

Add some balsamic vinegar.

034fresh mozz slices

I loaded this sandwich with fresh mozzarella….

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Lots of veggies…..

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The secret sauce…..

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And lots of love!

054one big sandwich

Enjoy!

Sloppy Jane! Meatless Monday with Carmen Garcia!

SloppyJane01 copy Meatless Monday PD

Sloppy Jane

Level: Easy and Quick!
Serves 4

Ingredients
vegan Sloppy Joe mix, one box www.fantasticfoods.com
2 cups bella mushrooms, sliced
1 small red onion, sliced
1 small tomato, sliced
1 3 oz. tomato paste
1tsp olive/canola oil
2 tablespoons, Liquid Smoke www.colgin.com
4 Ezekiel (flourless) toasted english muffin
1/4 cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
1 small dill pickle, sliced

Method

In a medium sauce pan bring 1 3/4 water to a boil. Mix in tomato paste.
Stir frequently. Lower heat and simmer.

Pour Sloppy Joe mix into water and tomato paste. Stir until ingredients thicken. Cover and simmer.

In a separate pan, add oil and lightly brown onions.

Set aside. In same pan, saute mushrooms with 2 tablespoons of Liquid Smoke and parsley until light golden brown.

Toast the english muffins. Add all of the fixings and serve.

The Sloppy Jane is a super fast and easy way to whip up a healthy and meatless meal. It is high in protein and fiber.

The flourless and sprouted grains of the english muffin is a low GI carbohydrate food that also contains fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals. It barely contains zero fat and it’s a filling meal for lunch or dinner.

Don’t let “Jane” fool you with the name. Both hearty and light, you won’t even notice it is a meatless and tasty treat.

In Gusto!

The Turista Chef
–Carmen Garcia

Good-Bye to Summer

tomatoes oantry diaries 3

It seems as though my summer came and went without much of a fuss. Like many people this year, I planted my first garden and had high hopes of tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and squash to spare.

I imagined myself giving them to friends and neighbors and freezing the extra to serve during winter. I was so naive! I barely grew enough to make one salad. But that’s fine with me. I learned alot and hope for a better yeild next year; with much less going to the deer who were not at all afraid to jump over the little fence I put up and enjoy my garden for themselves!

Here is the lion’s share of tomatoes which just came in. The plants quickly withered and turned brown and I feel lucky to have these.
Some went right into a basil, tomato salad with olive oil and the rest I ate on bread with a bit of homemade mayonnaise. I went “old school”. I made Depression Era sandwiches with my Recession Garden !

Courtesy of Julia Child, from Mastering the Art of French Cooking
Julia Child’s Hand-Beaten Mayonnaise

The following directions are for a hand-beaten sauce (using a wire whisk). For electric beaters, use the large bowl and the “moderately fast” speed for whipping cream. Continually push the sauce into the beater blades with a rubber scraper.

Ingredients

Round-bottomed, 2½ to 3-quart glazed pottery, glass or stainless steel mixing bowl. Set it in a heavy casserole or saucepan to keep it from slipping.
3 egg yolks
Large wire whisk
1 tablespoon wine vinegar or lemon juice (more drops as needed)
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon dry or prepared mustard
1½ to 2¼ cups of olive oil, salad oil or a mixture of each. If the oil is cold, heat it to tepid; and if you are a novice, use the minimum amount
2 tablespoons boiling water
Directions

Warm the bowl in hot water; dry it. Add the egg yolks and beat for 1 to 2 minutes until they are thick and sticky.
Add the vinegar or lemon juice, salt and mustard. Beat for 30 seconds more.
The egg yolks are now ready to receive the oil. While it goes in, drop by drop, you must not stop beating until the sauce has thickened. A speed of 2 strokes per second is fast enough. You can switch hands or switch directions, as long as you beat constantly.
Add the drops of oil with a teaspoon, or rest the lip of the bottle on the edge of the bowl. Keep your eye on the oil rather than on the sauce. Stop pouring and continue beating every 10 seconds or so, to be sure the egg yolks are absorbing the oil.
After 1/3 to 1/2 cup of oil has been incorporated, the sauce will thicken into a very heavy cream and the crisis of potential curdling is over. The beating arm may rest a moment. Then, beat in the remaining oil by 1 to 2 tablespoon dollops, blending it thoroughly after each addition.
When the sauce becomes too thick and stiff, beat in drops of vinegar or lemon juice to thin it out. Then continue with the oil.
Beat the boiling water into the sauce. This is an anti-curdling insurance. Season to taste.
If the sauce is not used immediately, scrape it into a small bowl and cover it tightly so a skin will not form on its surface.
Tips For Making Mayonnaise
Julia Child’s tips for homemade mayonnaise:

Room Temperature: Have all ingredients at room temperature. If they aren’t, warm the mixing bowl in hot water to take the chill off the egg yolks; heat the oil to tepid if it is cold.
Egg Yolks: Always beat the yolks for a minute or two before adding anything to them. When they are thick and sticky, they are ready to absorb the oil.
Adding The Oil: The oil must be added very slowly at first, in droplets, until the emulsion process begins and the sauce thickens into a heavy cream. Then, the oil may be incorporated more rapidly.
Proportions: The maximum amount of oil one large egg yolk can absorb is six ounces, or ¾ cup. When this maximum is exceeded, the binding properties of the egg yolks break down, and the sauce thins out or curdles. If you have never made mayonnaise before, it is safest not to exceed ½ cup of oil per egg yolk.

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